Wellspring Family Services Hosts Free Parenting Education

Wellspring Family Services invites families in the community to attend free Love and Logic Early Childhood Parenting Made Fun!™ classes. The program is designed for parents of toddlers and young children up to 6 years of age. The curriculum focuses on reducing whining, arguing, frustration, bedtime hassles, struggles over eating, morning craziness, and more. Childcare, workbooks, and refreshments are provided. Transportation assistance may be available.

Tom Bowman, LSW, a case manager in the Weirton Wellspring office, will be the facilitator for the classes. The classes provide practical techniques that help parents achieve respectful and healthy relationships with their children. The skills are easy to learn, change lives, and raise the odds of raising responsible kids.

The Love and Logic Early Childhood Parenting Made Fun!™ classes will begin on Thursday, April 13th at 5:30 pm, located at the Weirton Wellspring office, 3200 Main Street. There will be 6 class sessions. To register or for more information, call the Weirton Wellspring office at 304-748-3768.

The project is funded by a mini-grant awarded by the TEAM for West Virginia Children. Funding for the mini-grants is provided with support from the West Virginia Office of Maternal, Child and Family Health through combined federal funding sources.

Crittenton Services, Inc. Welcomes New Site Directors for Wellspring Family Services

Wellspring Family Services, the community-based counseling division of Crittenton Services, Inc., welcomes new site directors for its Parkersburg and New Martinsville offices.

Lya Burgess is the site director for the New Martinsville office. Burgess brings 22 years of therapy practice to the position. Prior to joining Crittenton, she conducted her solo private practice. Burgess earned a Regents BA from West Virginia State University, with an emphasis in Human Services. She went on to earn her MSW from West Virginia University in 1995. Burgess has been a Licensed Independent Social Worker (LICSW) in West Virginia since 2001. In her free time, Lya enjoys participating in horse shows with her quarter horse.

The site director position for the Parkersburg Wellspring Family Services office marks a promotion for Shannon Morris. Morris began working as a therapist in that office in 2015. She has more than a decade of experience in providing residential and outpatient services. Morris holds an Associate Degree in Human Services & Corrections from Hocking College and a Regents BA with an emphasis in Sociology from West Virginia University. She earned her MSW at West Virginia University in 2014. In addition to finding fun activities to do with her kids, Shannon likes to explore out-of-the-way small towns.

Wellspring Family Services offers outpatient and in-home counseling services to children, families and adults for more than 30 years. Wellspring therapists assist individuals and families struggling with behavioral health issues like depression, behavioral problems, addiction, divorce, parenting concerns, problems at schools, family relationships and emotional issues. Last year, more than 1700 clients chose Wellspring Family Services as a mental health provider. Wellspring Family Services has 7 offices serving 21 counties throughout West Virginia.

Crittenton Services, Inc. Receives Women’s Giving Circle Support

The Women’s Giving Circle of Wheeling is helping young women, ages 18-21, in Crittenton’s transition to independence program move forward with a grant to underwrite driver education. The Giving Circle’s investment in driver education reflects a commitment held in common with Crittenton—the empowerment of girls and young women.

“A driver’s license gives a young woman much more than just driving privileges,” says Martha Wright, Crittenton director of development. “It increases employment opportunities and expands her choices about where she might live, work, or study. We all rely on using a driver’s license as identification that allows us to travel by air, take care of banking, or even pick up prescriptions.”

In the state of West Virginia, license applicants under the age of 18 must log 50 hours of driving time with a parent or earn a driver education certificate from a county school system. Most kids that are transitioning out of care have not been able to meet those requirements. They have not had a parent or guardian to supervise driving practice. Agencies providing out-of-home care cannot take on the liability or the staffing requirements for driver supervision. In addition, many transitioning youths have been in multiple placements, resulting in a disrupted school history that limited access to school-based driver training.

The Women’s Giving Circle is a community of women philanthropists building a legacy of support to address the needs of women and girls in the Upper Ohio Valley. Crittenton Services, Inc. is a behavioral health agency, with a continuum of services including community-based care and a residential program for girls and young women, specializing in the needs of pregnant and/or parenting adolescents. For more information, visit www.florencecrittenton.net or call 304-242-7060.

 

Community Support Brings Christmas to Crittenton

Volunteers from the Crittenton Cares Volunteer Program, Delta Kappa Gamma of Marshall County, and the Ladies League of Marshall County wrapped all of the gifts which will be given to the girls and their little ones.

Volunteers from the Crittenton Cares Volunteer Program, Delta Kappa Gamma of Marshall County, and the Ladies League of Marshall County wrapped all of the gifts which will be given to the girls and their little ones.

It’s beginning to look a lot like Christmas at Crittenton Services! Thanks to the overwhelming generosity and support of our local community, the young women and children in Crittenton’s residential program will celebrate an extraordinary Christmas this year.

“A remarkable number of gifts poured in from several businesses, churches, schools and community organizations that took part in Crittenton’s Giving Tree gift program. The spirit of giving is truly alive in the Ohio Valley,” said Cathy Byers, Director of Marketing.

Among the groups contributing to Crittenton’s Giving Tree were Orrick, Herrington & Sutcliffe, Cabela’s, Valley Hospice, Ohio Valley Jaycees, Christ United Methodist Church, St. Michael’s Church, St. Vincent’s School, Roneys Point Church, Wheeling Jesuit University, West Liberty University, and many private donors, employees and friends of Crittenton. In addition, members of Delta Kappa Gamma of Belmont County made over 40 stockings filled with goodies for the residential clients.

“Many of the young women and children in our residential program have lacked a warm safe home, a loving supportive family, or the resources to meet their basic needs—they have not experienced the hope and magic of the season. The grace and generosity of our community members allows our clients to enjoy the season and just be kids...giggling, laughing, guessing what's in the boxes with her name on them. They will help their children unwrap and play with their new toys. Most importantly, each of these lovely girls will feel like they matter, are cared for, and are worthy of love, respect, peace, and joy,” said Veronica Reynolds, Director of Residential Services.

Volunteers from the Crittenton Cares Volunteer Program, Delta Kappa Gamma of Marshall County, and the Ladies League of Marshall County wrapped all of the gifts which will be given to the girls and their little ones.

The residents at Bishop Hodges Continuous Care Center at Wheeling Hospital adopted a family currently being served by Crittenton’s Wellspring Family Services, an outpatient and home-based counseling service. The family will receive a generous amount of gifts for their children, as well as household supplies and food.

Crittenton Services provides a continuum of behavioral health care, serving more than 1700 West Virginia clients annually. For more information on Crittenton Services and its behavioral health programs and services, as well as volunteering opportunities, go to www.florencecrittenton.net.

Oglebay Resort’s Seafood Bisque Voted Best Soup

Oglebay Resort’s Seafood Bisque is the winner of the annual Crittenton Services Soup and Salad Luncheon’s Best Soup award. The event was held last month and featured a soup cook off in which seven local chef/restaurants participated, including Coleman’s, The Soup Shack, Oglebay Resort, Ye Olde Alpha, West Virginia Northern Community College’s Culinary Arts Department, Parkhurst Catering at Wheeling Jesuit University and Crittenton’s chefs.

More than 300 people attended the luncheon and each attendee had a vote.  This year, the crowd chose the Seafood Bisque, prepared by Oglebay’s Chef de Partie Dawn Sylvia, as the Best Soup.

Money raised at the Soup and Salad Luncheon benefits the Crittenton Cares Volunteer Program which provides clients in the Residential Treatment Program with birthday parties, holiday celebrations, special events, Christmas gifts—and many other activities that bring fun and comfort to children who are in out-of-home placement.

Major sponsors for the event were Dr. Daniel Joseph, DDS, Delegate Erikka Storch, First Choice Realtors, Liberty Distributors, Main Street Bank, McKinley Carter Wealth Services, Raymond James Financial, Riesbeck’s and Wheeling Hospital.

 

Crittenton’s residential program is a behavioral health residential facility for girls 12-18 in West Virginia, offering the only licensed maternity care treatment facility in the state. Crittenton also serves young women who aren’t pregnant or parenting. The girls in treatment at Crittenton are victims of abuse, neglect, sexual assault, some of whom are battling drug addiction, depression and a variety of other challenges.

Crittenton also operates Wellspring Family Services, an outpatient counseling service available in 21 counties, with seven offices in Wheeling, Weirton, New Martinsville, Parkersburg, Morgantown, Harrisville and Huntington. Wellspring Family Services is currently serving more than 600 children, families and individuals.

For more information on Crittenton Services and its behavioral health programs and services, as well as volunteering opportunities, go to www.florencecrittenton.net.

Crittenton CEO and President, Kathy Szafran, Serves as Expert Panelist at the White House

(L-R) Rebecca Epstein, Executive Director of the Georgetown Center on Poverty and Inequality; Dr. Stephanie Covington, Co-Director of the Center for Gender and Justice; Kathy Szafran, MA, LPC, President and CEO of Crittenton Services, Inc.,; Dr. Karina Walters, Director of the Indigenous Wellness Institution; Dr. Monique Morris, President/CEO and Co-Founder of the National Black Women’s Justice Institute; Jim Sporleder, Educational Trauma-Informed Trainer, Sporleder Consulting; and Lian Cheun, Commissioner, President’s Advisory Commission on Asian Americans and Pacific Islanders

(L-R) Rebecca Epstein, Executive Director of the Georgetown Center on Poverty and Inequality; Dr. Stephanie Covington, Co-Director of the Center for Gender and Justice; Kathy Szafran, MA, LPC, President and CEO of Crittenton Services, Inc.,; Dr. Karina Walters, Director of the Indigenous Wellness Institution; Dr. Monique Morris, President/CEO and Co-Founder of the National Black Women’s Justice Institute; Jim Sporleder, Educational Trauma-Informed Trainer, Sporleder Consulting; and Lian Cheun, Commissioner, President’s Advisory Commission on Asian Americans and Pacific Islanders

Crittenton Services’ President and CEO, Kathy Szafran, served as an expert panelist at the "Trauma-Informed Approaches in School: Supporting Girls of Color and Rethinking Discipline” Conference held at the White House yesterday, Monday, September 19, 2016.  The conference was hosted by the White House Council on Women and Girls, together with the U.S. Department of Education, the Georgetown Law Center on Poverty and Inequality, and the National Crittenton Foundation.

The conference built upon the Administration’s commitment to promoting policies and practices that support the needs and potential of underserved populations, including marginalized girls, young women and their families. Despite progress made over the recent years in academic achievement, access and school support, girls, and particularly girls of color, continue to disproportionately face barriers in education.

Szafran was a member of the “Exploring Trauma-Informed Approaches to Supporting Girls of Color” panel – a group of experts Rebecca Epstein, Executive Director of the Georgetown Center on Poverty and Inequality, referred to as the “Dream Team” who could help “connect the dots between trauma and school discipline.”

Szafran addressed the unique challenges that rural communities face to provide trauma-informed care in comparison with urban areas. She explained, “When you’re from rural areas there are very, very limited resources. We’re looking at crisis for young girls who have no commonality, no shared cultures. When they come into residential treatment, they feel very much alone, and when trying to create an environment for them to return back to and have a community to embrace them, frequently, it doesn’t exist.”

Szafran also spoke about Crittenton’s Trauma-Informed Elementary Schools (TIES) Program and implementing trauma-informed approaches in school. The TIES Program brings trauma-informed services to early elementary school classes, grades Pre-K through grade 1.  The goal of the program is to bring early intervention to children who exhibit symptoms of chronic stress, or trauma, in the classroom—symptoms that interfere with the child’s ability to learn, such as disruptive, defensive, or withdrawn behavior. Szafran said, “Our therapists are training teachers how to observe and indicate trigger behaviors – behaviors that are indicative that a child is being affected by trauma in their home environments.  The responsibility is then to help teach the teacher ways of self-help regulation within the classroom and become a bridge between the home and the school.  That’s what we feel is most critical.” Szafran went on to explain that it’s a truly generational process for many children whose parents have also had very similar traumatic experiences.  The TIES program is currently in its second year and has expanded into eleven WV elementary schools in Hancock, Tyler, Ohio and Wood counties.

You may also view the panel discussion at https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Cro37ByMECo.  Kathy Szafran’s panel discussion begins at the 3 hour 24 minute mark. Szafran speaks about the challenges to trauma-informed care that rural communities face at the 3 hour 38 minute 27 second mark. She also speaks about implementing trauma-informed approaches in school at the 3 hour, 59 minute, 15 second mark.

Kathy Szafran leads a break-out panel discussion on trauma-informed, gender-responsive care at the White House.

Kathy Szafran leads a break-out panel discussion on trauma-informed, gender-responsive care at the White House.

Bachelorette Celebrates with Service to Crittenton

Bachelorette Celebrates with Service to Crittenton

Crittenton Services, Inc. hosted its first bachelorette party on campus, thanks to the generosity of a Wheeling bride and her bridesmaids.

Bridesmaid Sarah Kemp contacted Crittenton a few weeks ago, offering to volunteer in Crittenton’s residential program in lieu of the traditional bachelorette party for Wheeling bride Katie Hinerman. It would be a surprise for the bride, as the friends explained, “Katie loves to give back and we thought this would be perfect for her.” 

After some discussion, it was decided that the bridesmaid group would coordinate and assist with a beautification project on Crittenton’s campus, planting large flower pots. The bridesmaids purchased everything needed for the project, including a special “bridal” gardening trough for the bride.

The party was set for a Saturday morning. The bridesmaids and bride, along with the mother of the bride and mother of the groom, introduced themselves to the girls in Crittenton’s residential program and they began planting flowers.

“A bachelorette party is typically to celebrate one person and her closest girlfriends, but what a great opportunity it was to celebrate with lots of ladies! It was heartwarming,” sid bride Katie Hinerman.

“It was the best day. The girls were so excited to work with such an enthusiastic group, and they couldn’t wait to dig in the dirt. The girls were very proud of the finished product and couldn’t wait to place the pots around campus,” said Stacy Rich, Director of Marketing at Crittenton Services.

The planting was followed by a pizza party and a special bridal cake for the bride.

“Our girls need positive experiences like this one. It’s so important to have role models just like the bride and her friends and family. It’s something our girls will never forget,” said Rich.

Frederick’s Day Spa Salon Wants to Make Crittenton Girls Shine

Frederick’s Day Spa Salon will donate time and talent to the girls in Crittenton Services’ residential program by offering hair, nails and make up services.

The community service project is something Frederick’s owners Fred and Sharon DeChiazza wanted to do. The idea was developed by stylist Audrey Hamilton. Audrey has done community service work for years, volunteering her time and talents in a variety of ways.

“I’ve been thinking about doing this for some time and gathered some volunteers at the salon who wanted to help. And I couldn’t think of a better organization (Crittenton) to help,” said Hamilton.

Frederick’s will offer two hours every other Monday afternoon, beginning June 20, for a group of girls to come to the salon and receive haircuts and styles, make up services and manicures. All of the services will be free of charge.

“We had some people recently, including a former Crittenton client, come into the salon for services and they talked about the organization. It just solidified that we had chosen the right group of girls to assist,” added Hamilton.

“Crittenton is proud to call Fredericks Day Spa Salon a good friend. Our girls will love this experience and appreciate this so much. They need and deserve the chance to feel beautiful,” said Kathy Szafran, President and CEO.

The Crittenton Residential program helps females aged 12 through 21 with behavioral health services as well as a variety of life skills to promote self-sufficiency. Among the most critical components of the program is education, and in partnership with Ohio County Schools, Crittenton offers a full time on-site school with certified teachers. Crittenton also offers a TASC program.

Crittenton also operates Wellspring Family Services, an outpatient, home-based counseling service available in 21 counties, with seven offices in Wheeling, Weirton, New Martinsville, Parkersburg, Harrisville, Huntington and Morgantown. Wellspring Family Services is currently serving more than 600 children and adults.

Crittenton’s Cradles to Crayons Child Care Center offers before and after care services at Woodsdale, Steenrod and Middlecreek Elementary schools and the universal pre-k programs at Bethlehem and Middle Creek Elementary Schools.

For more information call 304-242-7060 or go to www.florencecrittenton.net.

Frederick’s Day Spa Salon has been serving the Ohio Valley since 1983. They have a team of more than 30 associates and offer a wide range of services, including hair, nails, pedicures, massage, facials, waxing, laser hair and tattoo removal and make up application. For more information, go to fredericks-salon.com.

Wellspring Cuts the Ribbon on New Huntington Site

Wellspring Family Services, a division of Crittenton Services, is cutting the ribbon on a new outpatient and home-based counseling office in Huntington, thanks to a grant provided by philosophy’s Hope & Grace Initiative.

Huntington Mayor Steve Williams will cut the ribbon at 11:00 a.m. with an open house to follow.

The Cabell County office, located on 1596 Washington Blvd. in Huntington, will bring much-needed outpatient and home-based services to the southwestern part of West Virginia, adding three service counties to 18 other counties where Wellspring has an established presence. The Huntington office will serve Cabell, Wayne and Putnam counties. New service site selection was based on needs assessments and recommendations from the West Virginia Department of Health and Human Resources.

Wellspring Family Services has been helping children, families and individuals with professional counseling services for more than 30 years. Offices serve as hubs, from which trauma-focused therapists visit clients at home, in schools, and in other community settings. Because Wellspring clients are predominantly children and adolescents, the entire family is part of the therapeutic process, making home-based care a convenient and effective approach to care delivery. Wellspring currently has offices in Weirton, Wheeling, New Martinsville, Morgantown, and Harrisville, Huntington and Parkersburg. Last year, more than 1400 clients chose Wellspring Family Services as a mental health provider.

“We are excited to become an important part of the Huntington area and surrounding communities. We know the need is there and we are thrilled to have our tauma-focused clinicians assist children and families,” said Beverly Petrelli, Chief Operating Officer.

Crittenton Plans Second Annual Trail Run

Crittenton Services, Inc. is planning its Second Annual Founding Father’s Trail Run/Walk 5K on Saturday, June 11, 2016 at 9:00 a.m. at Grand Vue Park, Moundsville, WV.

The Founding Father’s Trail Run/Walk 5K offers a challenging off-road course for runners and walkers. It will take place on Grand Vue’s scenic hiking trail, winding through the rugged hills of the park. This course is 3.1 miles (5K), beginning and ending adjacent to Grand Vue’s Red Barn.

The Crittenton agency began in Wheeling as the Florence Crittenton Home 121 years ago. Charles Crittenton was an active social reformer of the late 19th Century, organizing more than 100 Crittenton homes to help women in need. The race is to honor him and will raise money for Crittenton’s much-needed services to children and adults from across West Virginia.

“We are thrilled to offer this exciting, unique event again this year. Last year’s participants loved the course. We look forward to an even more exciting, successful run again this year,” said Stacy Rich, Director of Marketing, Crittenton Services.

Participants will receive a dri-fit race shirt, a participation medal and a light lunch following the race. There are also several door prizes, including a round of golf at the Moundsville Country Club and gift certificates to The 19th Hole.

This is a timed race. Age groups and awards are as follows:

·         Top 3 Male/Female Runners

·         Top 3 Male/Female Walkers

·         Age groups: 1-15, 16-19, 20-29, 30-39, 40-49, 50-59, 60-69, 70+

Online pre-registration is available at www.florencecrittenton.net. Registration is $35.  Prizes will be awarded for the top male and female finishers in each age category; overall prizes will also be awarded.

Sponsors include Gold, Khourey & Turak; Anthem, Inc.; First Choice America; Phillips, Gardill, Kaiser & Altmeyer; Grisell Funeral Homes; Joe Canestraro; Linebacker, Inc.; Hudson Premier PT and Fitness; MedExpress Urgent Care; Valley Pain Management; and Belmont Savings Bank.